Allo' Expat Croatia - Connecting Expats in Croatia
Main Homepage
Allo' Expat Croatia Logo


Subscribe to Allo' Expat Newsletter
 
Check our Rates
   Information Center Croatia
Croatia General Information
 
History of Croatia
Croatia Culture
Croatia Cuisine
Croatia Geography
Croatia Population
Croatia Government
Croatia Economy
Croatia Communications
Croatia Transportations
Croatia Military
Croatia Transnational Issues
Croatia Healthcare
Croatia People, Language & Religion
Croatia Expatriates Handbook
Croatia and Foreign Government
Croatia General Listings
Croatia Useful Tips
Croatia Education & Medical
Croatia Travel & Tourism Info
Croatia Lifestyle & Leisure
Croatia Business Matters
  Sponsored Links


Check our Rates

Culture & People
 
 
 

General

Croatian culture is the result of a 14 century-long history which has seen the development of many cities and monuments. The country includes seven World Heritage sites and eight national parks. Croatia is also the birthplace of a number of historical figures. Included among the notable people are three Nobel prize winners and numerous inventors.

Some of the world's first fountain pens came from Croatia. Croatia also has a place in the history of clothing as the origin of the necktie (kravata). The country has a long artistic, literary and musical tradition. Also of interest is the diverse nature of Croatian cuisine and the famous Croatian Traditional gift Licitar.

Croatians are protective of the their Croatian language from foreign influences, the language was under constant change and threats imposed by previous rulers (i.e. Austrian German, Hungarian, Italian and Turkish words were changed and altered to "Slavic" looking/sounding ones).

From year 1961 to year 1991, it was known as a dialect of the Serbo-Croatian language, while Croats use the Latin alphabet instead of Cyrillic of the Serbians. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Serbian and Yugoslav nationalist scholars began to impose policies to change or alter Croatian words into "Serbian" or "South Slavic" ones, which have infuriarated Croats over the purity and preservation of their native language. Assumably thousands of pre-modern Croatian words had Iranian/Persian, Illyrian, Greek/Hellenic and Teutonic/Frankish origins in Croatia's ancient history of ethnolinguistic influences.

Ancient Heritage

Ancient monuments from the Paleolithic era consist of simple stone and bone objects. Some of the earliest remaining historical features include 100,000 year old bones of a Neandertal man near Krapina (Krapina-Zagorje county).

The most interesting Copper Age or Eneolithic finds are from Vučedol culture. Out of that culture sprung out Bronze Age Vinkovci culture (named after city of Vinkovci) that is recognisable by bronze fibulas that were replacing objects like needles and buttons. Bronze Age culture of Illyrians, ethnic group with distinct culture and art form started to organize itself in 7th century BC. Numerous monumental sculptures are preserved, as well as walls of citadel Nezakcij near Pula, one of numerous Istrian cities from Iron Age.

Greeks from Syracuse in Sicily in 390 BC came to islands of Vis (Issa), Hvar (Pharos) and Korčula (Corcyra Nigra) and there have founded city-states in which they lived quite isolated.

While the Greek colonies were flourishing on the island, on the continent the Illyrians were organizing their centers. Their art was greatly influenced by Greek art, and they have even copied some. Illyrians even conquered Greek colonies on Dalmatian islands. Famous was the queen Teuta of Issa (today island of Vis) which waged wars with the Romans. But finally, Rome subdued the Illyrians in first century, cesar and after that the history of these parts is a history of Illyrian provinces of Rome and Byzantium.

The Romans organised the entire coastal territory by transforming citadels to urban cities. There have been at least 30 cities in Istria, Liburnia and Dalmatia with Roman citizenship (civitas). The best-preserved networks of Roman streets (decumanus/cardo) are those in Epetion (Poreč) and Jader (Zadar). The best preserved Roman monuments are in Pola (Pula) including an Amphitheater (an arena) from the 2nd century).

In the 3rd century AD the city of Salona was the largest (with 40,000 inhabitants) and most important city of Dalmatia. Near the city emperor Diocletian, born in Salona, built the Diocletian's Palace (around year 300 AD), which is largest and most important monument of late antique architecture in the World. In the 4th century Salona became the centre of Christianity for entire western Balkans. It had numerous basilicas and necropolises, and even two saints: Domnius (Duje) and Anastasius (Staš).

One of few preserved basilicas in western Europe (beside ones in Ravenna) from the time of early Byzantium is Euphrasian Basilica in Poreč from 6th century.

The early Middle Ages brought the great migration of the Slavs and this period was perhaps a Dark Age in the cultural sense until the successful formation of the Slavic states which coexisted with Italic cities that remained on the coast, each of them were modelled like Venice.


See more information on the next page... (next)


 

 
 

   



 


copyrights © AlloExpat.com
2018 | Policy